UlsterHelps.org

Question:

 Where do I start?

 

Answer:

This is a great first step. If you are looking to get help for yourself, a loved one, or your community, it is important to educate yourself on the resources available. Exploring the information offered on this website may help decide what option is best for you. Make a phone call and ask for help.

Question:

How will I know if the treatment facility I am interested in has any available beds?

Answer:

The OASAS (Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services) Bed Availability Dashboard allows you to see real time bed availability for any OASAS licensed treatment inpatient facility.  https://findaddictiontreatment.ny.gov/

Question:

What can I do if I can’t leave my job or family in order to go into rehab?

Answer:

There are options for individuals who might need to receive treatment, but have obligations that they may be unable to walk away from. There are Support Groups, Outpatient Treatment, and Medication Assisted Treatment all available locally.

Question:

What if I don’t have insurance?

 

Answer:

Visit NY State of Health to determine eligibility for available plans. You may also be income qualified for a Medicaid plan. For details and more information, call the Ulster County Medical Assistance Program at 845-334-5175

Question:

What if I don’t want anyone to know I am in treatment?

Answer:

HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) is a federal law that protects your rights over your health information, including who gets to look at your health information, your right to get a copy of your health information, make sure it is accurate and know who has seen it. This assures you privacy while in treatment. HIPPA Privacy Rule.

Question:

What if I have already tried substance use services and they haven’t worked?

Answer:

Things in life are constantly changing. What may have made rehab unsuccessful for someone in the past, might be different now. Was it the right type of treatment? Was there a solid support system? Has your attitude about recovery changed? Addiction changes the chemistry of the brain and it takes time to be able to get it back to normal. It is not uncommon for an individual to go to rehab two or more times before they find recovery. Don’t give up because there is always hope.

Question:

What if I’m told there is a wait list for services?

Answer:

When faced with a wait time between wanting help and being able to receive help don’t give up. Look into as many options as you can and try to stay positive. The time in between can be utilized in a positive way

Question:

What if my loved one doesn’t want help?

Answer:

When individuals become addicted to a drug, they no longer have the same will power as before. More often than not, it will seem impossible that they could ever get help. Educate yourself using National & State Resources on addiction. Focus on your own self-care. Attend support groups and see what local resources are available. If you feel strong enough, approach your loved one as a family and present a solid plan. Let your loved one know what his/her recovery looks like to you. Kas will add hope here.

Question:

What services are available to someone under 18?

Answer:

There are local services available for youth. Youth services focus directly on the unique challenges that adolescents and their families face.

Adolescent substance use needs to be identified and addressed as soon as possible.

anxiety disorders.

Adolescents are also especially sensitive to social cues, with peer groups and families being highly influential during this time. Therefore, treatments that facilitate positive parental involvement, integrate other systems in which the adolescent participates (such as school and athletics), and recognize the importance of prosocial peer relationships are among the most effective.

Question:

What services are available to someone who has both substance use and mental health issues?

Answer:

When someone experiences a mental illness and a substance use problem at the same time, the diagnosis is called a co-occurring disorder. Either substance abuse or mental illness can develop first. Symptoms of substance abuse or addiction can mask symptoms of mental illness, and symptoms of mental illness can be confused with symptoms of addiction. Co-occurring disorders can sometimes be difficult to diagnose which is why an assessment from a certified, licensed provider is very important. The most common method of treatment for co-occurring disorders today is integrated treatment in which an individual receives care for both a specific mental illness and substance abuse. Because there are many ways in which co-occurring disorders may occur, treatment will not be the same for everyone. Early detection and focused treatment can improve outcomes and the quality of life for those who need these services.   Clink on: